False Imprisonment

n. Holding a person prisoner in a confined space or through physical restraint, denying freedom of movement. Examples include being locked in a car that is driven without allowing the opportunity to get out of the car, being tied to a chair, or locked in a closet. False imprisonment may follow a false arrest, but is most similar to a kidnapping. If proven, false imprisonment is almost always the basis for a lawsuit for damages.